Gina Lawless Books

July 8, 2012

Writing From the Gut

There is so much information out there in the blogosphere on how to become self-published the proper way. So much of it is good, sound information. And if anyone is getting into the business of writing, it should be read, top to bottomuss. Any information you need is out there for the reading. Such as:

  • The importance of editing your work before it’s published.
  • The proper book cover design.
  • Marketing and advertising.
  • Using social media.

All of which should be studied profusely in today’s writing markets. Way back in the stone ages (when I was in school) my teachers would pound it into our heads, grammar, spelling, and punctuation! But, the really good teachers would tell us to reach into our gut for our stories. Pull out that piece of you which no one else knows about and write about it. Spill your emotions onto the paper and grab the reader’s attention. Let it ooze out of you like puss from an opened wound. (Directly from Mr. Neihoff, in heavy german accent) What a great teacher he was.

At that age, I was not tuned into my inner turmoil. Even if I had been, I dare not share it with anyone else! I seriously don’t think that I was mature enough to let it ooze until I had lived enough of a life, that I couldn’t hold the ooze any longer. By then, it wasn’t an ooze, but more of a gusher.

I wrote the short story, The Last Year and a Half  in a span of four days, altogether probably eight hours. I had no idea at the time where that story came from, except for the fact that cancer made me  angry. I have known twenty people in my life that have had it, or have died from it, my mother being the first in a long series of family and friends, my dear sister included. Yes, it made me furious!

When I wrote the story, I cried. I cried me a river. I still had no idea why. I wrote it in the first person POV as if I were experiencing this myself. When I was finished with it, I felt such an emotional regurgitation. What I had done was combine my sister and I into this one character. My sister’s battle with cancer, and my inept communication skills and unwillingness to let people in too far. Perhaps, that came from being weary of losing so many people in my life to this wicked disease, that I found it simpler and emotionally safer to keep the door closed tightly.

I think that’s what Mr. Neihoff was talking about. So, this is in honor of those that have lost the battle, and to those that have fought it hard and won. Thanks to this story, I have been able to reopen that door.

Go grab a copy for free at Smashwords, using this coupon code.   HB46F

Love and Peace.

Advertisements

5 Comments »

  1. I think this is the best advice of all. Thanks for sharing, 🙂

    Comment by Cynthia Bigrigg — July 8, 2012 @ 6:45 pm | Reply

    • In all the hub-bub of it all, it’s somethimes hard to remember why we write. Right?

      Comment by Gina Lawless — July 8, 2012 @ 6:50 pm | Reply

  2. I always write by instinct as well. Plans and storyboards are for wimps.

    Good luck with your work, and I am sorry for your loss.

    Thanks for the spot on the blogroll as well…!

    Comment by Michael Cargill — July 8, 2012 @ 7:53 pm | Reply

    • Always after a book is finished…where did I stash that stupid outline? I put your blog on my site because I truly do enjoy reading your posts, and BTW I’m reading Underneath right now and enjoying it immensely. I didn’t post about my losses for sympathy, but thank you. Writing that short story only made me realize that I had held onto to the grief for years…way too long, and writing it allowed some release, I think. Who needs therapy when you can write it out?

      Comment by Gina Lawless — July 8, 2012 @ 8:05 pm | Reply

  3. […] Writing From the Gut (ginalawlessbooks.wordpress.com) […]

    Pingback by Is losing someone an overrated emotion « For Whatever It's Worth… — July 16, 2012 @ 10:13 am | Reply


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: